In the media

28 July 2015
Times Live
The Department of Home Affairs has gone into damage control mode following a report that listed its Marabastad office as its most corrupt. In response to the damning finding, in which Durban was found to be the least corrupt, at 3%, the department has set up Operation Bvisa Masina - Vendan for "throw out the rot" - to restore order throughout Home Affairs branches. A response team comprising officials from Home Affairs, the State Security Agency, the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation and S A Revenue Service has been set up
26 July 2015
SABC Rights and Recourse
LHR's Wayne Ncube discusses the recently released "Queue Here for Corruption: Measuring Irregularities in South Africa's Asylum System" on SABC's Rights and Recourse
27 July 2015
Business Day
The Department of Home Affairs went into damage control mode following a report that listed its Marabastad office as its most corrupt. In response to the damning finding, the department had set up a response team and a counter-corruption initiative — Operation Bvisa Masina, which is Venda for "throw out the rot" — to restore order throughout Home Affairs branches. Home Affairs Minister Malusi Gigaba said: "We’re bent on cleaning the rot."
27 July 2015
Voice of America
Corruption is pervasive throughout the asylum process in South Africa, according to a report published this month. Almost a third of asylum seekers and refugees have to pay bribes for correct documentation violating the Refugees Act that stipulates that they are not required to pay any fees for documentation. Rights groups say incompetence and graft within the Home Affairs department is contributing to the number of undocumented foreigners who have recently become the focus of a government “clean-up” operation.
25 July 2015
Times Live
Certain home affairs offices have been singled out for attention because they are apparently hotbeds for fraud and corruption. This was the message delivered by Home Affairs Minister Malusi Gigaba at a press briefing in Pretoria on the report about corruption at Marabastad Refugee Reception Office. The report‚ released early last week by Lawyers for Human Rights (LRA) and the African Centre for Migration and Society‚ concluded that corruption in that particular area was serious.
24 July 2015
Mail & Guardian
On any given weekday somewhere between 500 and well over a thousand people line up at the Marabastad office of the department of home affairs, on the fringes of downtown Pretoria, to be processed for paperwork to confirm or reconfirm their status as asylum seekers or refugees in South Africa.
23 July 2015
Eyewitness News
Corruption Watch has described widespread fraud and corruption at the Home Affairs department’s refugee reception offices as a black market. On Wednesday, the African Centre for Migration and Society released the findings of a report, revealing the shocking extent of corruption in South Africa’s asylum system. Foreign nationals have apparently been paying bribes to have their paperwork processed. Corruption Watch said officials are running a black market at the expense of vulnerable asylum seekers and refugees.
23 July 2015
All Africa
The report released by Lawyers for Human Rights (LHR) and the African Centre of Migration & Society (ACMS) on institutionalised corruption within the asylum application processes at Home Affairs offices countrywide must be tabled in Parliament and must be addressed. The report contains shocking statistics and findings and produces evidence of human rights abuses and rampant corruption at refugee reception centres. The findings in the report include:
23 July 2015
SABC News

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SABC on the LHR/ACMS report "Queue Here For Corruption". The report details corruption at SA's reception offices
23 July 2015
Times Live
Of the five refugee reception offices in the country‚ Marabastad in Pretoria is the most corrupt‚ a research report released by Lawyers for Human Rights (LHR) and the African Centre for Migration and Society (ACMS) revealed. The report entitled "Queue here for corruption - Measuring irregularities in South Africa's asylum system" was launched at a seminar at the University of the Witwatersrand's law school on Wednesday.