In the media

22 July 2015
Eyewitness News
Calls have been made for a reform of the Home Affairs Department to end corruption at refugee reception offices. On Wednesday, the African Centre for Migration and Society released a new report documenting shocking levels of corruption in South Africa’s asylum system. Foreign nationals reportedly have to pay multiple bribes at reception offices to have their paperwork finalised. Researchers say the single person decision making system is an ideal breeding ground for corruption.
22 July 2015
PowerFM

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ACMS's Loren Landau discusses the LHR/ACMS report "Queue Here For Corruption" on East Rand Stereo. The report details corruption at SA's reception offices.
22 July 2015
Business Day
ALMOST a third of the people who have to deal with SA’s refugee reception offices have been asked for bribes, a new report suggests. It details the extent of corruption in the refugee-and asylum-seeking process and concludes that corruption in this area is "very serious". The report, to be released on Wednesday by Lawyers for Human Rights and the African Centre for Migration and Society, also concluded that this state of affairs was the result of a "deliberate government choice" — to avoid addressing the fundamental issues in the system.
22 July 2015
The Daily Vox
A report on corruption levels in South Africa’s asylum-seeking system, called Queue Here for Corruption, has found that almost one-third of refugees have experienced corruption at a refugee reception office. But it doesn’t begin there: the report finds that refugees are at the mercy of corrupt officials from the second they enter South Africa, a trend that continues as they attempt to access services at the reception offices. THE DAILY VOX TEAM summarises six ways in which asylum seekers have to pay to access their rights.
22 July 2015
eNCA
Lawyers for Human Rights (LHR) is calling on the public protector to investigate alleged corruption at refugee offices throughout South Africa. This follows the organisation’s two year study of the country’s asylum system. They have found widespread corruption throughout the asylum process, from border crossings, refugee reception centers, application processes and detention centres. LHR wants Home Affairs to initiate an independent investigation into each stage of the asylum process.
22 July 2015
The Star
South Africa’s refugee law holds the promise of protection to those fleeing persecution – including politically motivated rape and torture – and civil wars in their home countries. Unfortunately, our Refugee Reception Offices (RROs) have failed to realise this promise and are instead characterised by inefficiency, poor quality decision-making, and corruption. As a result, the refugee system now provides documentation for those who are able to pay, while those genuinely in need of protection but without sufficient funds are rejected as economic migrants.
22 July 2015
IRIN
In South Africa, asylum seekers and refugees in need of documentation often have no choice but to pay for it. So says a new report exposing how corruption and bribery have permeated nearly every level of the country’s asylum system: from border crossings, to queues outside refugee reception offices, to what takes place inside those offices.
22 July 2015
Eyewitness News
Corruption Watch says it’s shocked by the findings of its latest investigations, which have revealed the extent of malpractice at refugee reception offices across the country. On average, asylum seekers have reported being forced to pay at least four bribes to have their legal documents finalised. Investigations have found that bribes are paid for a number of reasons, including directing applicants to the correct queue.
21 July 2015
Times Live
Allegations of beating and electrocution of prisoners in North West has sparked calls for torture charges to be laid against prison authorities. The alleged assaults are being investigated by human rights lawyers, the Wits Justice Project, police and the Judicial Inspectorate for Correctional Services. Inmates at the Losperfontein prison outside Brits were allegedly beaten with batons, doused in water, electrocuted with tasers and denied medical attention.
18 July 2015
Pretoria News
The conviction and subsequent 15-month incarceration of two men may have resulted in something good as the world will be watching what happens in Swaziland when it comes to the rule of law. “I think our case in a way helped Swaziland to fix itself. Politicians may now be reluctant to phone judges and making deals with them at the risk of us reminding them what happened,” Bheki Makhubu, editor of The Nation magazine, said during an interview with the Pretoria News.